Hamptons Real Estate Pros Compare the Hamptons to Palm Beach

POSTED ON August 1, 2016 - 5000 North Ocean

Interview segments edited from an article by Michael Braverman | Hamptons Magazine

After “Tumbleweed Tuesday,” the day after Labor Day in the Hamptons, much of the summer community moves on to its South Florida vacation homes. At least that’s the opinion of Michael Braverman of Hampton’s Magazine. We found his article in Hamptons Magazine quite intriguing. Here’s a bit of the interviews with his panel of real estate experts and designers to compare the Hamptons East End and Palm Beach lifestyles. The panel included: Tim Davis, Sara and Jim McCann, and Campion Platt.


From left: Tim Davis, Sara and Jim McCann, and Campion Platt.
PHOTO: HAMPTONS MAGAZINE

There seems to be some connection between the Hamptons and Palm Beach unlike other places in Florida. Why do you think that is?

Jim McCann: I would certainly say that there is a strong connection between the markets. The Hamptons is an outlet for New Yorkers to have fun and relax in the summer months; Palm Beach is the same in the winter months.

Sara McCann: One of the things that makes the Hamptons and Palm Beach so magical is the historic preservation. You go from village to village and they each have their own character and personality-that is why different people are drawn to different areas throughout Palm Beach and the Hamptons.

Jim McCann: If Mizner were designing homes in Palm Beach today, he wouldn’t have the gorgeous 20-foot arch front door. They don’t allow third-story towers anymore. I understand there is a need for zoning codes, but a lot of times it can be overly restrictive. We see a younger clientele and a younger mindset that wants more modernistic homes. They have a heck of a time getting approval, but they are fantastic to see.

How does that translate to interior design and d&eacutecor?

Sara McCann: In Palm Beach, the community shifted. People are worried about their dogs, kids, visitors… It is still chic and a beautiful environment, but people want to live in their homes. They don’t want them to be just show places.

Campion Platt: Similar to the Hamptons, whether their house is classic or modern on the outside, most of the interiors are modern or tending towards modern. The other thing that I think is a struggle for a lot of the houses [in Palm Beach] is lack of closet space. You walk into houses that have zero closets in their bedrooms, and you have to figure out how to take more real estate out of the bedroom to make a closet. People are looking [to renovate] some of these older houses, and they are very challenged trying to get all of their young children and all of their items in the house because of the lack of storage.

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To view the original Hampton’s Magazine article, click below.